Photo Caption: Budapest 1931

"My family lived in a third floor apartment, in Budapest, that faced out on a busy street (now called Lenin Boulevard). It was an exciting street—colorful, crowded, noisy. There were many shops—a glamorous hardware store displaying shiny knives behind its huge plate glass front, several bookstores with books of many colors piled and strewn around, coffee houses with grouchily servile waiters carrying white napkins on their black left sleeves, and stores full of toys and candy and crutches and clothes and shoes and watches. The sidewalk was broad, and milling, crowds of people separated the shop windows from teh curb-side trees and scales (your weight for a penny) and newspaper kiosks and taxi stands. The crowds seemed always to be there—they were there when went to school early in the morning and they were there on the rare occasions when I was brought home late at night from an excursion or from a movie. Later, when I grew up, went to Hungary as an American tourist, and was out real late at night, the crowds were still there. The lights were bright and gypsy music could be heard from the coffee houses.” —Paul R. Halmos, I Want to Be a Mathematician…

Photo Caption: Budapest 1931


"My family lived in a third floor apartment, in Budapest, that faced out on a busy street (now called Lenin Boulevard). It was an exciting street—colorful, crowded, noisy. There were many shops—a glamorous hardware store displaying shiny knives behind its huge plate glass front, several bookstores with books of many colors piled and strewn around, coffee houses with grouchily servile waiters carrying white napkins on their black left sleeves, and stores full of toys and candy and crutches and clothes and shoes and watches. The sidewalk was broad, and milling, crowds of people separated the shop windows from teh curb-side trees and scales (your weight for a penny) and newspaper kiosks and taxi stands. The crowds seemed always to be there—they were there when went to school early in the morning and they were there on the rare occasions when I was brought home late at night from an excursion or from a movie. Later, when I grew up, went to Hungary as an American tourist, and was out real late at night, the crowds were still there. The lights were bright and gypsy music could be heard from the coffee houses.” —Paul R. Halmos, I Want to Be a Mathematician…